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Σύνδεσμος Κυπρίων Αρχαιολόγων

Association of Cypriot Archaeologists

Prof. Ioanna Kakoulli - Tracing Color: Photophysical Properties of Pigments as Fingerprint Markers in Cultural Property, Art and Antiquities Forensic Investigations

Filed under:
Διάλεξη - Lecture
Event Date:
Monday, 18 December 2017 19:30 - 21:00
Location:

Ερευνητική Μονάδα Αρχαιολογίας
Γλάδστωνος 12
Λευκωσία, Λευκωσία 1095

Η Ερευνητική Μονάδα Αρχαιολογίας τoυ Πανεπιστημίου Κύπρου οργανώνει τη Δευτέρα, 18 Δεκεμβρίου 2017 και ώρα 19:30 διάλεξη της Prof Ioanna Kakoulli (Professor Materials Science and Engineering Department, Henry Samueli School of Engineering and Applied Science, University of California Los Angeles, United States) με τίτλο: "Tracing Color: Photophysical Properties of Pigments as Fingerprint Markers in Cultural Property, Art and Antiquities Forensic Investigations". Η διάλεξη είναι ανοικτή για το κοινό και θα δοθεί στο κτήριο της Ερευνητικής Μονάδας Αρχαιολογίας, Οδός Γλάδστωνος 12, Λευκωσία

Περίληψη:

Archaeological objects, the material remains of our human past, are limited and irreplaceable cultural re-sources that are under imminent threats from environmentally-linked effects, political conflicts, and looting. As with modern materials, their archaeological counterparts were produced through processes by which raw materials were carefully selected, processed, and transformed into cultural products. In this context, this talk examines two of the oldest artificially produced and most widespread pigments employed in the decoration of important ancient polychrome artifacts for over four millennia: Egyptian blue, a sintered polycrystalline compound (frit); and madder lake, an organic-inorganic composite. Both pigments are photoluminescent after electronic excitation by photons in the visible (Vis) and re-emission of photons in the visible (Vis) and near infrared (NIR). From an archaeological materials science perspective, the objective of this presentation is twofold: first to explore the structure–property relationships of these pigments and how these relate to the operational sequences involved in their manufacture and second, through selected case studies that probe luminescence at multiple length scales using multimodal imaging and spectroscopy, to illustrate the extent to which the characteristic Vis and NIR luminescent properties of these pigments can provide reliable fingerprint markers, for example, in forensic cases pertaining to authentication and attribution of looted antiquities.

Research Collaborators: Dr. Christian Fischer1, S/A Razmik Madoyan2
Ph.D. Candidates: Roxanne Radpour1 and Yuan Lin1

1 University of California Los Angeles, Molecular and Nano Archaeology Laboratory and Archaeomaterials Group, Materials Science and Engineering Department, Henry Samueli School of Engineering and Applied Science.
2 Homeland Security Investigations, Department of Homeland Security

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